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Alcohol Addiction Treatment Guide

A comprehensive guide to alcohol addiction & finding alcohol treatment centers.

Most people who experiment with mind-altering substances don’t become addicted. Even with rates of addiction being higher today than ever before, there are still many more people who decide that substance abuse isn’t for them. However, with roughly 320 million people living in the U.S., even a relatively small percentage of Americans developing addictions to alcohol and drugs — approximately 25 million people over the age of 12 or 10 percent of the U.S. population — represents a staggering number.

It seems that despite knowing how prevalent addiction had become, many people underestimate the addictive power of alcohol and drugs. Or alternately, perhaps they overestimate their self-control, convincing themselves that they’ll be the exceptions to the rule rather than another statistic.

While there are a breadth of dangerous, mind-altering substances that pose a major threat to our society, alcohol remains the most widely consumed and abused substance of them all. But our affinity for the drink isn’t exactly new; people have been making and drinking alcohol for at least 3,500 years and perhaps even longer.

For much of that time, it was believed that anyone who couldn’t control their drinking were immoral, weak in character, or had lost touch with God. Although we now know that alcoholism and drug addiction are essentially a brain disease, this knowledge is actually relatively new and is what has led to the explosion of alcoholism recovery resources that are available to those in need today.

Ironically, the wide variety of treatment options for people with alcoholism has resulted in a different issue, which is that many people are unable to narrow down the many treatment options that are available to the form or forms of treatment that best address their individual needs. Overwhelmed by the volume of possibilities, this often results in an alcoholic getting inadequate treatment that inevitably leads to relapse or an alcoholic finding it easier to stay in active alcohol dependence.

Therefore, Drug Treatment Center Finder has created this comprehensive resource that you or anyone else in need can use to (a) figure out if you have a drinking problem, (b) learn about the different types of treatments that are available, and (c) make the most informed decision possible when choosing an alcohol addiction rehab.

HOW TO RECOGNIZE IF YOU HAVE A DRINKING PROBLEM

Alcohol is the primary substance of addiction in the United States, followed by addictions to illicit drugs and prescription medications. There are approximately 25 million people who struggle with substance abuse and 17.6 million people struggle with alcohol addiction specifically, representing 1 in 12 Americans.
And yet, while so many people are in need of drug and alcohol treatment, only a small fraction actually receives it. People may still be in denial of their alcohol addiction or aren’t fully aware that their drinking has become a problem, which is why it’s important to know some of the most common signs of alcoholism.

READY TO
MAKE A CHANGE?

THERE IS NO TIME LIKE THE PRESENT
AND OUR TREATMENT SPECIALISTS CAN HELP.

READY TO
MAKE A CHANGE?

THERE IS NO TIME LIKE THE PRESENT
AND OUR TREATMENT SPECIALISTS CAN HELP.

Effects on self

When a person continues to abuse alcohol, he or she is inevitably going to suffer from its numerous effects. In fact, habitual alcohol abuse has been linked to a number of neural, cardiovascular, psychological, and even spiritual problems. However, one of the first changes is a decline in overall wellness, which can be attributed to decreased immune system.

The continuous presence of alcohol in the body is also extremely damaging to the kidneys and liver with cirrhosis itself being linked to a number of lethal issues that will reduce a person’s life expectancy. Overall, the continued abuse of alcohol drains a body of its health while causing a number of unseen problems with serious implications later in life.

In the mind, chronic alcohol abuse is known to cause a dramatic change in personality. Because of how alcohol changes the brain’s neurochemistry, a person with a drinking problem will become very unpredictable emotionally, prone to sudden and extreme mood swings in between bouts of depression.

These psychological changes have even caused many to experience suicidal ideations. Moreover, the spiritual effect of an alcohol problem makes all the other personal issues even worse since one’s life would feel devoid of meaning.

  • Weakening of immune system
  • Reduced neurological functioning
  • Unpredictable or unprovoked mood swings
  • Reckless or risk-taking behavior
  • Weight loss or gain
  • Putting lives of self and others in danger

There’s no way to safely abuse alcohol or recreationally use drugs. According to a United Nations report, each year there are more than 2.5 million global deaths due to the effects of alcohol abuse. That’s 2.5 million deaths that could be prevented with effective, high-quality substance abuse treatment.

Effects on family

Profound, personal changes due to a drinking problem can affect a person’s external life, especially when it comes to relationships. Loved ones—romantic partners, children, parents, siblings, grandparents, and so on—of a person developing an alcohol addiction are more likely to notice when the person begins to behave differently than normal.

As the changes become more pronounced, loved ones are likely to begin asking questions that may be met with deception or denial. Chronic substance abusers are usually secretive about their habits, which causes them to push others away in an effort to conceal their problems.

In some cases, it becomes much worse than the person becoming distant. Once a drinking problem causes extreme financial distress, the person could resort to manipulating or stealing from loved ones to get the money needed to sustain the alcohol problem. This can cause a family turmoil, which not only affects relationships between the alcoholic and their loved ones, but the interrelationships between family and friends of the alcoholic as well.

When we think about diseases like alcoholism, we tend to focus on how it affects the individual struggling with addiction. But the implications of alcoholism are far greater than that. Alcohol addiction has a huge impact on families, with numerous studies showing:

  • An estimated 28 million U.S. children have at least one alcoholic parent
  • 76 million Americans, or 43 percent of the adult population, grew up with an alcoholic loved one
  • There are currently 14 million American adults who are addicted to alcohol with many million more who regularly exhibit dangerous alcohol consumption behaviors
  • Children of alcoholIcs are four times more likely to develop alcoholism in adulthood than their peers with non-alcoholic parents
  • Children of alcoholic parents exhibit high instances of depression, anxiety, and anger management issues as well as intimacy issues later in life
Loss of employment

The casual drink here and there during social occasions isn’t likely to have a major effect on a person’s financial state. However, someone who is struggling with alcohol addiction will begin to feel the effects of financial strain.

It becomes more difficult to continue paying bills while funding a drinking problem. On top of that, if a person is intoxicated most of their time, their judgment tends to not be the most sound. Poor choices for money management will add more financial stress, which will making drinking more of a burden to upkeep and possibly lead to the person making sacrifices to do so.

Meanwhile, there’s a significantly increased likelihood for an alcoholic to lose their job. Showing up to work intoxicated will result in immediate termination. Going to work hungover will not allow the person to work at their full potential and may even pose a significant safety risk depending on their profession, such as for those who work in construction or the medical field.

And calling out of work too often to avoid revealing problems with drinking will still pose too many questions from employers, who may view this as a sign of instability and unreliability. This can be heightened if employers find out about recent DUIs, arrest charges related to drinking, or money disappearing.

If a person struggling with alcohol addiction loses their job, they will no longer be able to financially support their drinking self-sufficiently. This could make them desperate for money needed to buy more alcohol and lead to severe consequences, such as theft, arrest, or violence.

Loss of friends

Loss of Friends

Developing a drinking problem will have a major effect on all of a person’s relationships, not just familial relationships. Especially when the person’s friends don’t drink or have problems with alcohol, becoming an alcoholic is extremely alienating.

And since intoxication causes people to make poor decisions, it’s very likely that someone with a drinking problem will put his or her friendships in jeopardy by taking advantage of them, insulting them, or otherwise causing them to feel like they’d be better off if they ended the friendships.

On the other hand, when an alcoholic’s friends have drinking problems as well, it’s likely that those friends may contribute to the development, severity, and longevity of a person’s alcoholism. In effect, having friends who encourage binge drinking can put a person in dangerous situations, such as suffering from alcohol poisoning, becoming injured while under the influence, or committing crimes (either knowingly or unknowingly).

Along with chronic and severe alcohol use and abuse, a drinking problem can quickly lead to severed ties between the one suffering and their closest of friends. Sometimes, even bonds between family members are known to suffer under the nature of addiction.

Effects on self

When a person continues to abuse alcohol, he or she is inevitably going to suffer from its numerous effects. In fact, habitual alcohol abuse has been linked to a number of neural, cardiovascular, psychological, and even spiritual problems. However, one of the first changes is a decline in overall wellness, which can be attributed to decreased immune system.

The continuous presence of alcohol in the body is also extremely damaging to the kidneys and liver with cirrhosis itself being linked to a number of lethal issues that will reduce a person’s life expectancy. Overall, the continued abuse of alcohol drains a body of its health while causing a number of unseen problems with serious implications later in life.

In the mind, chronic alcohol abuse is known to cause a dramatic change in personality. Because of how alcohol changes the brain’s neurochemistry, a person with a drinking problem will become very unpredictable emotionally, prone to sudden and extreme mood swings in between bouts of depression.

These psychological changes have even caused many to experience suicidal ideations. Moreover, the spiritual effect of an alcohol problem makes all the other personal issues even worse since one’s life would feel devoid of meaning.

  • Weakening of immune system
  • Reduced neurological functioning
  • Unpredictable or unprovoked mood swings
  • Reckless or risk-taking behavior
  • Weight loss or gain
  • Putting lives of self and others in danger

There’s no way to safely abuse alcohol or recreationally use drugs. According to a United Nations report, each year there are more than 2.5 million global deaths due to the effects of alcohol abuse. That’s 2.5 million deaths that could be prevented with effective, high-quality substance abuse treatment.

Effects on family

Profound, personal changes due to a drinking problem can affect a person’s external life, especially when it comes to relationships. Loved ones—romantic partners, children, parents, siblings, grandparents, and so on—of a person developing an alcohol addiction are more likely to notice when the person begins to behave differently than normal.

As the changes become more pronounced, loved ones are likely to begin asking questions that may be met with deception or denial. Chronic substance abusers are usually secretive about their habits, which causes them to push others away in an effort to conceal their problems.

In some cases, it becomes much worse than the person becoming distant. Once a drinking problem causes extreme financial distress, the person could resort to manipulating or stealing from loved ones to get the money needed to sustain the alcohol problem. This can cause a family turmoil, which not only affects relationships between the alcoholic and their loved ones, but the interrelationships between family and friends of the alcoholic as well.

When we think about diseases like alcoholism, we tend to focus on how it affects the individual struggling with addiction. But the implications of alcoholism are far greater than that. Alcohol addiction has a huge impact on families, with numerous studies showing:

  • An estimated 28 million U.S. children have at least one alcoholic parent
  • 76 million Americans, or 43 percent of the adult population, grew up with an alcoholic loved one
  • There are currently 14 million American adults who are addicted to alcohol with many million more who regularly exhibit dangerous alcohol consumption behaviors
  • Children of alcoholIcs are four times more likely to develop alcoholism in adulthood than their peers with non-alcoholic parents
  • Children of alcoholic parents exhibit high instances of depression, anxiety, and anger management issues as well as intimacy issues later in life
Loss of employment

The casual drink here and there during social occasions isn’t likely to have a major effect on a person’s financial state. However, someone who is struggling with alcohol addiction will begin to feel the effects of financial strain.

It becomes more difficult to continue paying bills while funding a drinking problem. On top of that, if a person is intoxicated most of their time, their judgment tends to not be the most sound. Poor choices for money management will add more financial stress, which will making drinking more of a burden to upkeep and possibly lead to the person making sacrifices to do so.

Meanwhile, there’s a significantly increased likelihood for an alcoholic to lose their job. Showing up to work intoxicated will result in immediate termination. Going to work hungover will not allow the person to work at their full potential and may even pose a significant safety risk depending on their profession, such as for those who work in construction or the medical field.

And calling out of work too often to avoid revealing problems with drinking will still pose too many questions from employers, who may view this as a sign of instability and unreliability. This can be heightened if employers find out about recent DUIs, arrest charges related to drinking, or money disappearing.

If a person struggling with alcohol addiction loses their job, they will no longer be able to financially support their drinking self-sufficiently. This could make them desperate for money needed to buy more alcohol and lead to severe consequences, such as theft, arrest, or violence.

Loss of friends

Loss of Friends

Developing a drinking problem will have a major effect on all of a person’s relationships, not just familial relationships. Especially when the person’s friends don’t drink or have problems with alcohol, becoming an alcoholic is extremely alienating.

And since intoxication causes people to make poor decisions, it’s very likely that someone with a drinking problem will put his or her friendships in jeopardy by taking advantage of them, insulting them, or otherwise causing them to feel like they’d be better off if they ended the friendships.

On the other hand, when an alcoholic’s friends have drinking problems as well, it’s likely that those friends may contribute to the development, severity, and longevity of a person’s alcoholism. In effect, having friends who encourage binge drinking can put a person in dangerous situations, such as suffering from alcohol poisoning, becoming injured while under the influence, or committing crimes (either knowingly or unknowingly).

Along with chronic and severe alcohol use and abuse, a drinking problem can quickly lead to severed ties between the one suffering and their closest of friends. Sometimes, even bonds between family members are known to suffer under the nature of addiction.

LEVELS OF CARE

Those who aren’t familiar with addiction and recovery assume that the programs offered at every rehab are virtually the same, but there are many different treatments and therapies that are used in alcohol treatment rehabilitation. Several levels of care are chosen based on each person’s specific needs.

When choosing the right type of treatment, a person must determine what their needs are while considering things like: whether a particular location would be preferred, how long the treatment program should be, what treatment approach would be the most appropriate, the cost of the program, whether the treatment center accepts certain types of insurance, and a number of other specific needs that are unique for each and every client.

By determining one’s needs and preferences, choosing the right form and level of care is a much more intuitive process.

Detox Program

Detox Program

While most diseases are either physical or psychological, alcohol addiction is somewhere in the middle with elements of both. Most of the treatments that one is likely to associate with alcoholism recovery — individual counseling, group therapy, relapse-prevention training — are intended to address the psychological side of addiction. The physical side of alcoholism, which is a person’s bodily or physical dependence on alcohol, is addressed mostly separately. Additionally, a person’s physical dependence on alcohol is addressed before beginning the main treatment program so that his or her body is stabilized and in a state of health by the time he or she is participating in counseling and group sessions, otherwise one would likely experience withdrawal symptoms during counseling that would limit a person’s ability to focus.

Alcohol Detox at a Glance

  • Ensures patient safety
  • Continuous medical care
  • Designated support team
  • Relaxing, comfortable environment
  • Alleviates withdrawal symptoms
  • Promotes comfort with medications
  • Time to focus on self
  • Curtail alcohol dependence
  • Prepares patients for treatment

Detox programs are typically the first stage of a person’s recovery from alcoholism because they address and help him or her to overcome physical dependence on alcohol prior to starting a treatment program. More specifically, alcohol detoxification treatment is the initial period during which a person’s body is cleansed of alcohol and any other chemicals or toxins, which restores a person to a state of physical health. Since alcohol detoxification can be dangerous when a person isn’t monitored, detox programs assure patient safety by offering continuous, round-the-clock supervision and medical care. The goal of the physicians, detox technicians, and other staff members who care for patients during detox treatment is to make each patient as safe and comfortable as possible while they prepare themselves for the next phase of recovery.

Detox Program

Detox Program

While most diseases are either physical or psychological, alcohol addiction is somewhere in the middle with elements of both. Most of the treatments that one is likely to associate with alcoholism recovery — individual counseling, group therapy, relapse-prevention training — are intended to address the psychological side of addiction. The physical side of alcoholism, which is a person’s bodily or physical dependence on alcohol, is addressed mostly separately. Additionally, a person’s physical dependence on alcohol is addressed before beginning the main treatment program so that his or her body is stabilized and in a state of health by the time he or she is participating in counseling and group sessions, otherwise one would likely experience withdrawal symptoms during counseling that would limit a person’s ability to focus.

Alcohol Detox at a Glance

  • Ensures patient safety
  • Continuous medical care
  • Designated support team
  • Relaxing, comfortable environment
  • Alleviates withdrawal symptoms
  • Promotes comfort with medications
  • Time to focus on self
  • Curtail alcohol dependence
  • Prepares patients for treatment

Detox programs are typically the first stage of a person’s recovery from alcoholism because they address and help him or her to overcome physical dependence on alcohol prior to starting a treatment program. More specifically, alcohol detoxification treatment is the initial period during which a person’s body is cleansed of alcohol and any other chemicals or toxins, which restores a person to a state of physical health. Since alcohol detoxification can be dangerous when a person isn’t monitored, detox programs assure patient safety by offering continuous, round-the-clock supervision and medical care. The goal of the physicians, detox technicians, and other staff members who care for patients during detox treatment is to make each patient as safe and comfortable as possible while they prepare themselves for the next phase of recovery.

Outpatient Care

Outpatient Program

Only about 1 in every 10 people struggling with substance abuse will seek out or receive treatment, which means the remaining are on track to remain in active chemical dependence.

There have been a number of theories to explain this dramatic discrepancy. Some of the most common objections that alcoholics have to recovery include fear of alcohol withdrawals, an aversion to admitting being addicted to alcohol, fear of not being strong enough to actually overcome alcoholism, and concern over the cost of treatment.

However, most of the fears and concerns that make alcoholics resistant to recovery can be addressed by providing them with a form of treatment that’s more accessible, flexible, and much lower in cost.

“The appeal of outpatient care is in its flexibility and offering a less intensive curriculum than other forms of treatment. This makes outpatient programs ideal for those who are in overall good health and are working alcoholism recovery into their existing schedules.”

While inpatient care entails temporary residency in a rehab until treatment has been completed, outpatient care is a form of treatment in which clients continue to live in their home environments while commuting to rehab on designated days to receive treatment.

Since outpatient programs don’t require residency, they’re less expensive than other forms of care. And since clients live at home during treatment, outpatient programs can seem much less daunting than inpatient and residential treatment.

The curricula of outpatient alcoholism treatment programs is most often limited to the most essential treatments and therapies since the total amount of treatment time is more limited in outpatient care than it is in inpatient. Despite being a less intensive form of treatment, outpatient programs are considered optimal for individuals who, aside from their alcoholism, are in good health, have a safe and stable home environment, and whose alcohol addictions aren’t considered extremely severe.

Outpatient programs typically offer the least amount of oversight, last between one and three months, and take place just a few days each week, making them preferable to those who must continue fulfilling their responsibilities while in treatment.

Intensive Outpatient

Intensive Outpatient

If outpatient programs are the least intensive form of alcoholism treatment, intensive outpatient programs could be considered a step up with regard to the amount and variety of treatment available.

Intensive outpatient programs, or IOPs, are still a type of outpatient care, but they’re intended to offer a higher level of treatment intensity than standard outpatient care. Most intensive outpatient programs meet three to four days each week for up to four hours of treatment each day.

In addition to offering the core components of alcoholism recovery programming—individual counseling, interpersonal process groups, addiction education, relapse-prevention training—there will be a selection of treatments that are more specific in their focus with which clients can personalize their programs to a certain degree.

Intermediate Quality of Care

Intensive outpatient programs are unique in that they offer a level of care that’s in between outpatient and inpatient. People of fair health with stable living conditions will benefit from intensive outpatient care.

Flexible Treatment Schedule

While offering a higher quality of care, intensive outpatient programs still give clients the opportunity to incorporate recovery into their existing schedules.

Affordable, yet Effective

There are many people who may not require inpatient-level care while also preferring something more than standard outpatient treatment. Intensive outpatient care is a happy medium; better treatment that’s still affordable.

For instance, a client in intensive outpatient treatment may choose to include twelve-step group sessions in their treatment while another person might choose to participate in life-skills training or stress management sessions. Again, the extent to which a client can personalize an intensive outpatient program is somewhat limited, but there’s greater potential to have more specific or unique needs met in an intensive outpatient program than what’s offered in standard outpatient programs.

While a number of people choose intensive outpatient treatment for their primary treatment, it’s become quite common—and even encouraged—for those who complete inpatient programs to then transition into intensive outpatient programs. This way, they can continue adjust to being back in their communities while continuing to receive a reduced level of treatment and structure.

Partial Hospitalization

Partial Hospitalization

Do you seek inpatient-level care, but can’t commit yourself to a residential program and an absence of between one and three months? Partial hospitalization treatment can give you the best of both worlds: an intensive, inpatient-like curriculum on an outpatient basis.

Partial hospitalization programs (PHP)—also commonly referred to as day treatment or partial day treatment programs—were intended to offer the best of both outpatient and inpatient treatment.

Essentially, partial hospitalization treatment is an inpatient-like curriculum offered in an outpatient-like format. This makes them ideal for those who have stable, safe, and alcohol-free home environments, but who may have a greater need for medical care and supervision than would be available in outpatient and intensive outpatient programs.

In addition to a greater level of structure and supervision, partial hospitalization programs allow for the greatest amount of curriculum personalization of any outpatient program since they offer much more treatment time and a better selection of treatments. Taking place five or more days per week for about six hours each day, partial hospitalization programs represent a pretty significant time commitment.

Inpatient Program

Inpatient Program

Although most people would prefer some type of outpatient program, in many cases that’s simply not enough. Especially with alcoholism, a person’s addiction is often much more severe than they might think due to how the body adapts to continuous alcohol consumption over time.

When a person addicted to alcohol abruptly ceases consumption, there’s the potential for life-threatening withdrawal symptoms and a need for an intensive, daily regimen of counseling, group sessions, and other therapies for the person to have the greatest chance of achieving lasting sobriety. Therefore, it’s often recommended for alcoholics to complete detox treatment followed by inpatient care.

  • At least 64 percent of all people receiving substance abuse treatment are being treated for alcoholism, which shows that while there are many forms of chemical dependency, alcohol is the most problematic substance by a large margin.
  • According to estimates, more than 100,000 people die from alcohol abuse and alcohol-related incidents each year, including car crashes caused by drinking and driving, falls and other accidental injuries, and alcohol-related homicides.

After completing a detox program, a client may transition into an inpatient alcohol treatment program. Inpatient programs require client residency for the duration of treatment, which can last from one to three months, or even six months to a year, in extended or long-term inpatient program.

While being the most intensive—and the most successful—form of treatment, it’s also the treatment that allows for the absolute highest degree of customization and personalization. Clients may receive up to eight hours of treatment seven days a week and then choose treatments, therapies, and activities that best address their needs for the rest of their day.

These additional services might include gender-based groups, holistic treatments, experiential therapies, nutritional therapy, and many more possibilities. Additionally, inpatient care offers the highest level of medical care with round-the-clock supervision, making this type of treatment especially beneficial to anyone who has health problems in addition to alcohol addiction.

FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS

In addition to the fear and intimidation many people addicted to alcohol feel regarding the recovery process, many are also concerned about the financial side of rehabilitation. Alcohol and drug rehabs—especially inpatient facilities—are perceived as being very expensive, but that doesn’t mean receiving treatment is impossible.

There are many affordable alcoholism treatment programs available, as well as several ways that a person could potentially fund his or her recovery. Those who are in need of treatment for alcoholism can: choose a rehab and program covered by their insurance, pay out of pocket, pursue the available lending options, and/or apply for scholarships and grants that will fund alcoholism treatment.

Insurance

It used to be uncommon for a person’s health insurance plan to cover any sort of substance abuse program, causing many people in need to go without. However, the passing of the Affordable Care and Patient Protection Act—also known as ACA or colloquially as “Obamacare”—in 2011 made substance abuse treatment one of the essential health benefits covered by a person’s health care plan.

In other words, people who have private or government health insurance plans are likely to be eligible for insurance coverage of substance abuse treatments they need. The only drawback is that a health insurance plan, whether through a provider or the government, doesn’t necessarily pay the full cost of treatment, but rather a percentage.

In most cases, a given plan will cover between 50 and 90 percent of the cost of substance abuse treatment, so although that’s certainly helpful, it’s important to remember that there will still be an amount due that is left to the client’s responsibility.

Knowing when either you or a loved are in need of help of treatment for alcohol addiction, is unfortunately only part of the battle for sobriety. Doing comprehensive research on the different insurance programs out there and what they cover is important to ensuring success.

Self-Pay

Probably the most desirable means of funding substance abuse treatment, self-pay refers to a client paying out of their own pocket for treatment. While being the most straightforward option, paying out of pocket isn’t going to be an option for everyone. This is especially true given how frequently alcohol addiction causes great financial hardship.

However, with health insurance plans typically not covering the entire cost of treatment, people are more likely to have to pay some amount themselves. The main benefit of self-pay is that, for those able to cover the cost of their own treatment, you choose what you pay for, allowing your options to be at your disposal instead of what is allowed in your HMO network or insurance plan.

Sometimes the best way to go about receiving and paying for treatment is the straightforward approach of paying out of pocket. Whenever one pays for treatment through different third party sources, it can often have several charges and hidden costs, while self-pay does not.

Loans

Most people don’t think about loans when brainstorming ways to pay for rehab, but there are actually more lending options available than you might think.
Getting a loan from family members would be the optimal route to go since this would offer the most flexible payment plan and is probably the only zero-interest rate a person would ever find. Know that family members and friends may not be jumping to hand over former alcoholics large sums of money. So if they’re hesitant to be financially supportive, it would be useful to mention that they could make the payment directly to the rehab.

Alternately, there are a number of lenders who offer competitive financing options specifically for people trying to pay for their addiction treatment. These types of loans typically have respectable interest rates and other perks, such as deferring the first payment until a certain amount of time after the completing treatment.

And finally, there’s always the possibility of taking out a personal bank loan. Many recommend starting with local credit unions since these loans are a bit easier to get and have lower interest rates than national lenders.

One of the most popular forms of payment today, due to the prices related to some treatment centers and programs they offer, is taking out a loan to pay for treatment. There are several programs available that ensure a low interest rate when using the loan for treatment.

Scholarship and Grants

Another desirable option—and one many people aren’t aware is a possibility—is to find scholarships and grants, which are kind of like loans that you don’t have to pay back.

Many states offer federal grants for the purpose of funding alcohol or drug rehab and, in fact, many libraries have reference books containing almost all of the state- and federal-level funding options that are available, including how to qualify and apply.

A number of rehabs offer their own scholarships as well, either based on demonstrated need or sometimes as a means of subsidizing the cost of a client’s treatment. Intake coordinators of most alcohol and drug rehabs can help point people inquiring about a treatment center’s scholarship and grant opportunities, so feel free to call the center and ask.

Scholarships and grants are probably one of the most sought after and desirable options when it comes to paying for treatment. Due to the disease of alcoholism and addiction, there are a plethora of different scholarships and grants offered by local governments and private companies to help people in need.

Insurance

It used to be uncommon for a person’s health insurance plan to cover any sort of substance abuse program, causing many people in need to go without. However, the passing of the Affordable Care and Patient Protection Act—also known as ACA or colloquially as “Obamacare”—in 2011 made substance abuse treatment one of the essential health benefits covered by a person’s health care plan.

In other words, people who have private or government health insurance plans are likely to be eligible for insurance coverage of substance abuse treatments they need. The only drawback is that a health insurance plan, whether through a provider or the government, doesn’t necessarily pay the full cost of treatment, but rather a percentage.

In most cases, a given plan will cover between 50 and 90 percent of the cost of substance abuse treatment, so although that’s certainly helpful, it’s important to remember that there will still be an amount due that is left to the client’s responsibility.

Knowing when either you or a loved are in need of help of treatment for alcohol addiction, is unfortunately only part of the battle for sobriety. Doing comprehensive research on the different insurance programs out there and what they cover is important to ensuring success.

Self-Pay

Probably the most desirable means of funding substance abuse treatment, self-pay refers to a client paying out of their own pocket for treatment. While being the most straightforward option, paying out of pocket isn’t going to be an option for everyone. This is especially true given how frequently alcohol addiction causes great financial hardship.

However, with health insurance plans typically not covering the entire cost of treatment, people are more likely to have to pay some amount themselves. The main benefit of self-pay is that, for those able to cover the cost of their own treatment, you choose what you pay for, allowing your options to be at your disposal instead of what is allowed in your HMO network or insurance plan.

Sometimes the best way to go about receiving and paying for treatment is the straightforward approach of paying out of pocket. Whenever one pays for treatment through different third party sources, it can often have several charges and hidden costs, while self-pay does not.

Loans

Most people don’t think about loans when brainstorming ways to pay for rehab, but there are actually more lending options available than you might think.
Getting a loan from family members would be the optimal route to go since this would offer the most flexible payment plan and is probably the only zero-interest rate a person would ever find. Know that family members and friends may not be jumping to hand over former alcoholics large sums of money. So if they’re hesitant to be financially supportive, it would be useful to mention that they could make the payment directly to the rehab.

Alternately, there are a number of lenders who offer competitive financing options specifically for people trying to pay for their addiction treatment. These types of loans typically have respectable interest rates and other perks, such as deferring the first payment until a certain amount of time after the completing treatment.

And finally, there’s always the possibility of taking out a personal bank loan. Many recommend starting with local credit unions since these loans are a bit easier to get and have lower interest rates than national lenders.

One of the most popular forms of payment today, due to the prices related to some treatment centers and programs they offer, is taking out a loan to pay for treatment. There are several programs available that ensure a low interest rate when using the loan for treatment.

Scholarship and Grants

Another desirable option—and one many people aren’t aware is a possibility—is to find scholarships and grants, which are kind of like loans that you don’t have to pay back.

Many states offer federal grants for the purpose of funding alcohol or drug rehab and, in fact, many libraries have reference books containing almost all of the state- and federal-level funding options that are available, including how to qualify and apply.

A number of rehabs offer their own scholarships as well, either based on demonstrated need or sometimes as a means of subsidizing the cost of a client’s treatment. Intake coordinators of most alcohol and drug rehabs can help point people inquiring about a treatment center’s scholarship and grant opportunities, so feel free to call the center and ask.

Scholarships and grants are probably one of the most sought after and desirable options when it comes to paying for treatment. Due to the disease of alcoholism and addiction, there are a plethora of different scholarships and grants offered by local governments and private companies to help people in need.

There’s no way to safely abuse alcohol or recreationally use drugs. According to a United Nations report, each year there are more than 2.5 million global deaths due to the effects of alcohol abuse. That’s 2.5 million deaths that could be prevented with effective, high-quality substance abuse treatment.

FAQS WHEN CHOOSING AN ALCOHOL ADDICTION TREATMENT CENTER

It’s not easy to find the right alcohol addiction treatment facility and program that best addresses a person’s unique needs.

These are several of the questions that are commonly asked when a person is trying to choose a rehab, and answers that might make alcohol addiction recovery less intimidating or the selection process much less stressful.

Unfortunately, alcohol and drug addiction is a lifelong disease that requires active effort to maintain recovery. There is no “cure.” Addiction develops after an extended period of substance abuse and once you have it, it’s with you forever.

However, that doesn’t mean you can’t live a normal, healthy life free from physical and psychological dependence on alcohol. Helping you achieve that kind of freedom is actually the purpose of an alcohol rehab. So while it can’t cure the disease, you might say rehab gives you the tools to force the disease into remission. Then keeping it in remission is up to you.

That’s actually not correct. A person can still be an alcoholic without losing a job, getting behind on bills or rent, and even without drinking every day. In fact, there are a number of people who cite keeping their jobs and not falling into financial ruin as proof that they aren’t alcoholics, but the “functioning alcoholic” is simply a myth. Additionally, just because a person hasn’t lost their job, financial stability, and relationships yet doesn’t mean those things won’t happen sooner or later.

Whether or not detox treatment is needed before rehab depends on each person. A number of factors are considered when determining whether detox treatment is needed, including the length of time spent in active alcohol addiction, how much the person drinks, whether they have also been abusing other substances, and so on.

In cases of severe alcoholism, detox treatment is strongly suggested so that a client can be monitored, ensuring that the person remains safe throughout the detox process while receiving round-the-clock medical care to keep them relaxed and comfortable. Still, anyone who’s seeking treatment for alcohol addiction can benefit from detox treatment.

Absolutely. It’s often said that relapse is part of the recovery process, and while the extent to which that is true could be debated, many people will have brief “slips” before they are able to sustain their abstinence indefinitely. The important thing is to not get discouraged by any slips you might have during the recovery process.

Obviously, relapses and slips should be avoided at all costs, but if a slip happens it’s important to consider it a learning experience and continue with your recovery plans instead of allowing a slip to turn into a full relapse.

Technically, an employer can’t fire a person who needs medical treatment, but this is a bit more complicated than that. For instance, an employer can fire a person who misses an extended period of work due to their substance abuse problem, and a person can be fired if they are discovered to be or have been under the influence while on the job.

But there are actually several possible ways to go about getting treatment for addiction without sacrificing your job to do so. For instance, there's the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) that gives each employee the right to twelve weeks of paid or unpaid leave every twelve months to handle a health or medical condition that would prohibit them from working.

Although there are some employers who are more understanding and willing to let employees return to work after substance abuse treatment, there’s also the possibility that they would disapprove, in which case they might seek some type of technicality that’s unrelated to the substance abuse but would validate a termination.

Still, a job shouldn’t come between a person and their health. If going to rehab could be an issue, it’s possible to take a leave of absence from work under the FMLA without giving a specific reason. If a reason is required, a person could open a case with a human resources employee, who would be required to keep the details of someone’s medical leave confidential.

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